Water levels in Red River are falling

Residents of the Cannon Road area helps the Bossier Parish Sheriff’s Office in evacuating residents on Cannon Road. Lt. Bill Davis, Bossier Parish Sheriff’s Office

Water levels in the Red River are slowly declining.

At around 10 a.m. Monday, the Red River was measured to be at 30.95 feet, according to the National Weather Service. Flood stage is 30 feet.

The river is forecast to continue to drop with the possibility with the water levels to fall below 30 feet after Friday. However, a flood warning is in effect for the river until Saturday morning until the warning is cancelled.

Flooding of the Red River on May 7, 2019, at the Shreveport Riverview Park.

The Shreveport-Bossier area is predicted to be sunny or mostly clear through the work week, with the chance of showers and thunderstorms Saturday and Sunday.

Daytime temperatures during the week are expected to range from low to high 80s. Nighttime temperatures may range from high 50s to mid-60s.

Water levels rose last week because of heavy rainfall that occurred throughout the week.

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Between Tuesday, May 7, and Sunday, May 12, the Shreveport area recorded 8.05 inches of rain, according to a preliminary report by the National Weather Service released on Sunday morning.

The highest areas of rainfall recorded in Louisiana during that period occurred in the Denham Springs and Brownfields areas. Denham Springs recorded 10.22 inches and Brownfields recorded 10.14 inches, according to the report.

At one point over this past weekend, the Red River reached a high of 31.26, per records by the National Weather Service.

Flooding of the Red River on May 7, 2019, at the Shreveport Riverview Park.

In early March, the river crested to 31.39 feet.

The No. 1 historic crest recorded by the NWS occurred on Aug. 10, 1849, when the water crested 45.90. The water levels would not reach near that level until May 28, 1892, when the waters rose to 45.70 feet.

The highest the river has crested since 2000 was on June 9, 2015, when the river reached 37.14 feet.

Emily Enfinger is the breaking news reporter for The Shreveport Times, covering crime and court. Follow her on Twitter at @EmilyEnfinger. To email, click here.

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